Terry Laughlin, The Master Who Changed My Life

57 Comments

“Life is not designed to make things easy for us, but present challenges that help us grow.”
– Terry Laughlin

This episode is special to me. While I didn’t know it at the time, this ended up being  Terry Laughlin’s (@TISWIM) final long-form interview. Terry passed away from cancer complications on October 20, just two weeks after we recorded this interview.

Terry was the founder of Total Immersion Swimming and co-author of Total Immersion: The Revolutionary Way To Swim Better, Faster, and Easier. He had a profound impact on me — teaching me to overcome a lifelong fear of water and swimming (read all about it here). But more than that, he’s been an inspiration for the way I’ve done anything since.

Terry coached three college and two USA Swimming club teams from 1973 to 1988, improving each team dramatically. In that time, he developed 24 national champions at all strokes and distances — the first national champions produced by four different teams.

In 1989, Terry founded Total Immersion Swimming and turned his focus from working with young, accomplished swimmers to adults with little experience or skill (like me). But it’s not just about swimming; Terry’s elegant method of deconstruction and logical progression is the epitome of what I strive to do when I’m talking about learning any skill — from investing to learning languages.

It’s with a heavy heart but much gratitude that I was able to interview Terry before he passed.  Please enjoy, savor, and digest what Terry had to impart. And be sure to check out Terry’s gift for listeners of this podcast: a free seven-day membership to the Total Immersion Academy online training center.

TF-ItunesButtonTF-StitcherButton


QUESTION(S) OF THE DAY: What was your favorite quote or lesson from this episode? Please let me know in the comments.

Scroll below for links and show notes…

Selected Links from the Episode

Show Notes

  • How I was introduced to Terry and Total Immersion Swimming after many failed attempts to overcome my fear of water. [08:27]
  • Swimming has gone from something I dreaded to something I try to do as much as possible — and it’s empowered me in ways beyond what I could have anticipated. [12:27]
  • How I fulfilled the bet that drove me to seek Terry’s help in the first place. [14:10]
  • In his nineties, Dr. Paul Lurie proves you’re never too old to learn — and even improve existing skills. [16:10]
  • How Paul Lurie helped swimming legend Marilyn Bell relearn how to swim in her seventies. [20:04]
  • Even Terry didn’t begin as a “natural” swimmer. [22:01]
  • Terry’s epiphany about technique while teaching at U.S. Merchant Marine Academy. [25:31]
  • Where did the bones of Total Immersion Swimming enter the picture? [31:55]
  • How Bill Boomer, head coach of the men’s swim team at the University of Rochester, changed Terry’s way of thinking. [37:28]
  • Terry tells us about the break he took from coaching to explore other career avenues. [45:44]
  • Why did Terry return to coaching? [48:21]
  • Where did the name “Total Immersion Swimming” come from? [50:24]
  • Terry talks about opening his first swim camp. [51:03]
  • How would Terry start training a reluctant swimmer? [54:58]
  • Understanding first principles and embracing the counterintuitive across disciplines. [59:21]
  • On avoiding error points in meta-learning, the two error points common to beginning swimmers, and why Terry considers kickboards to be useless as teaching implements. [1:02:49]
  • Helpful drills and exercises for instilling basic swimming principles. [1:11:12]
  • What Terry learned from George Leonard about the possibility of learning mastery of a skill even at an advanced age. [1:13:48]
  • How would Terry teach someone to persist through a plateau on the path to mastery? [1:17:44]
  • What has helped me continue through some of my own plateaus? [1:21:18]
  • The story of Phil — who went from most challenged student to matching the level of Total Immersion Swimming’s best coaches in 18 months. [1:24:51]
  • What contributes to effective self-coaching? [1:29:39]
  • Terry talks about the origin of his cancer diagnosis and explains the circumstances. [1:38:13]
  • How Terry coped with his diagnosis. [1:41:11]
  • Expressing appreciation for the life-improving toolkit that Terry has given me, and which I’ve shared with countless others. [1:45:19]
  • After thirty years with incredible success, why does nobody else teach Total Immersion Swimming? [1:49:17]
  • Terry shares the five first principles of intelligent, improvement-oriented swimming. [1:50:33]
  • How these principles helped me overcome my personal swimming shortcomings. [1:55:09]
  • Four action items Terry suggests you try next time you’re in a pool. [1:57:26]
  • Parting thoughts. [2:00:33]

People Mentioned

Posted on: October 29, 2017.

Please check out Tribe of Mentors, my newest book, which shares short, tactical life advice from 100+ world-class performers. Many of the world's most famous entrepreneurs, athletes, investors, poker players, and artists are part of the book. The tips and strategies in Tribe of Mentors have already changed my life, and I hope the same for you. Click here for a sample chapter and full details. Roughly 90% of the guests have never appeared on my podcast.

Who was interviewed? Here's a very partial list: tech icons (founders of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Craigslist, Pinterest, Spotify, Salesforce, Dropbox, and more), Jimmy Fallon, Arianna Huffington, Brandon Stanton (Humans of New York), Lord Rabbi Jonathan Sacks, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Ben Stiller, Maurice Ashley (first African-American Grandmaster of chess), Brené Brown (researcher and bestselling author), Rick Rubin (legendary music producer), Temple Grandin (animal behavior expert and autism activist), Franklin Leonard (The Black List), Dara Torres (12-time Olympic medalist in swimming), David Lynch (director), Kelly Slater (surfing legend), Bozoma Saint John (Beats/Apple/Uber), Lewis Cantley (famed cancer researcher), Maria Sharapova, Chris Anderson (curator of TED), Terry Crews, Greg Norman (golf icon), Vitalik Buterin (creator of Ethereum), and nearly 100 more. Check it all out by clicking here.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Comment Rules: Remember what Fonzie was like? Cool. That’s how we’re gonna be — cool. Critical is fine, but if you’re rude, we’ll delete your stuff. Please do not put your URL in the comment text and please use your PERSONAL name or initials and not your business name, as the latter comes off like spam. Have fun and thanks for adding to the conversation! (Thanks to Brian Oberkirch for the inspiration)

57 comments on “Terry Laughlin, The Master Who Changed My Life

  1. Hi Tim,

    It’s sad to hear this news comes out just at the same time with the podcast. Although swimming is not a subject I find interesting because as you were at one point, I am not a big fan of swimming at the moment, I know it meant much to you at that time and I’m looking forward to hear some more insight on it. From looking at the show notes, however, you don’t talk too much about your experience, but I know your questions are just as good as your answers, so should be a good podcast, as usual.

    Thank you
    //Felix

    Like

    • Hi Tim,

      Great podcast as always. I’m learning so much from you.

      Ever since I read your book “Tools of titans”, I became your fan and I slowly starting implementing the insights presented in the book (I’m feeling good about myself already). Started reading one new book a week, got out of my tiny debt and started investing. All thanks to you 🙂

      Keep rocking and thanks for everything you do.

      Create more > consume less.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I ran across TI when I could no longer run and had to swim to complete my Army Physical Fitness Test. I swam like a turtle and seriously wondered how it was possible. Once I listened and incorporated TI I (almost) felt guilty at how much easier swimming was than running. So Terry has been a mentor and friend for a long time. My favorite part was reminding myself how giving yourself is all that matters.

    Like

  3. I took total Immersion 10 years ago to help with my Triathlon training. I loved the course and recommended it to several friends and fellow Tri people.

    I’m truly sad to hear of Terry’s passing, thanks for getting this out Tim.

    Like

    • Ben Greenfield, I used to work with Dr. Dan Pompa. That’s where I was introduced to your work. Your book “Beyond Training” is sitting about 10 feet away from me right now and it had been read and referenced several times. Keep up the great work!

      Like

  4. Tim, Thank you for this. Terry was a good friend, gracious and passionate. It’s so good to hear all this in one interview. He gave much to many.

    Like

  5. Tim, thank you for sharing the wisdom of another great man and mentor. I know you will be forever grateful for having him in your life. I am truly sorry for your loss.

    Like

  6. Tim, in October 2015, I was standing on the shores of a quaint Mexican beach south of Rosarito watching surfers dance on a fantastic wave and bemoaning the fact that I couldn’t be out there in the water with them. At that moment, I was super envious of those surfers, because in the past I have had my ass handed to me on many occasions trying to learn how to surf. The underlining issue with my lack of success in surfing: horrible swim technique.

    I went back to the condo and opened my laptop and searched for swim schools in my hometown back in CO. I came across your Ted talk, then downloaded your Open Water Swimming episode from the Tim Ferriss Experiment on iTunes. When I returned home from my vacation I ordered the Total Immersion book and downloaded Terry’s videos from his website. I committed to swimming each morning at 5 am (thank you Joko Willink) for nearly the whole of 2016.

    Without overstating the fact, swimming has empowered me, has positively changed my life, has elevated my meditation practice, and instilled confidence in me.

    I want to say thank you for being so vulnerable about your struggles with swimming and fear of the water. Your example has certainly spread Terry’s message and strengthened his mission, and I am sure he was supremely proud to have you in his life. I am grateful for both you and Terry and will be thinking of you both the next time I jump in the water.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. This was a tough one, emotional, raw and totally transparent. Please thank his daughters for the extras that truly showed the whole family in an authentic and courageous light. I hope that his mission continues with your help. Many lessons learned from. this broadcast. Thank you Tim and Laughlin Family.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Hi Tim: Thanks for sharing this great podcast. It is tough to lose such a close mentor. My family has a close mentor – Tao Porchon-Lynch. She is 99 years old and listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the World’s Oldest Yoga Instructor. She is a true inspiration and lives by the words ” There is nothing you can not do.” She walked with Gandhi and has many other incredible stories. I think she would make a great interview for you. Look her up!

    Like

  9. Tim, Thank you for this wonderful interview. I shared the podcast with my family as we grew up in the same small town. It was a catalyst to learning more about Terry and my family as my mother shared fond memories of the Laughlin’s. I learned not only about Terry – but his mom and dad (and my parent’s) due to your podcast. Thanks for providing this interview and helping families connect in deeper ways.

    Like

  10. What an Amazing way that the Good Lord has of communicating Tim…
    a friend sent me Your interview with Terry….before listening i decided total him and say HELLO…and then cried when i heard the news …
    am sharing some videos with You that i think you;ll appreciate:
    on YouTube:
    Barry Shore: How Total Immersion Changed My Life
    ~~you’ll like this: since this was made have passed 6,007 miles…. which is swimming from venice ca to s korea 😉 (YAY Terry!)

    [Moderator: additional text and link removed.]

    May Terry’s Memory be for a Blessing as he helped so many swim the sea of LIFE

    Like

  11. Hi Tim,

    This interview was amazing, so enjoyable listening to Terry speak so well and passionately about his purpose. It will change how I am.

    I am in tears having listened to the final interview with Terry’s daughters for the unbelievably difficult situation they faced, the agony of it all and for beautiful person that Terry was. I was diagnosed with cancer last month and had surgery about 3 weeks ago. I guess it has only really hit me now what it all means and how I’ve totally screwed up my life. Terry said everything he’d done had prepared him for these moments…I wish I could say the same.

    To Terry’s daughters – I am so sorry for your loss, but glad that you had such a wonderful person that was your Dad.

    Like

  12. Tim,
    I’m the very bad swimmer that went to a pretty good swimmer that Terry told you about in this podcast. He was an extraordinary person and I am fortunate to have learned from him. He changed my life as well. He not only taught me how to swim but more importantly he taught me to be mindful and purposeful. Thank you for sharing his story.

    Phil Crews

    Like

  13. To his dying breath it was so clear how much he loves and once to transform people around him through his medium… Swimming!

    It made me cry to also hear his daughters, through his process orientation, show him why it’s now time to rest.

    Like

  14. Very insightful information that delves deep across the board. Very wise gentleman and I’m thankful for the content. I am reminded a lot of his mission to reach others before he left similarly to the novel Tuesday’s by Morrie by Mitch Albom. If you have not read, I strongly recommend this short read. Thank you, Tim and sending good vibes your way!

    A quote from the book Tuesday’s by Morrie by Mitch Albom:
    “Life is a series of pulls back and forth. You want to do one thing, but you are bound to do something else. Something hurts you, yet you know it shouldn’t. You take certain things for granted, even when you know you should never take anything for granted. ‘A tension of opposites, like a pull on a rubber band. And most of us live somewhere in the middle.’ Sounds like a wrestling match, I say. ‘A wrestling match.’ He laughs. ‘Yes, you could describe life that way.’ So which side wins, I ask? ‘Which side wins?’ He smiles at me, the crinkled eyes, the crooked teeth. ‘Love wins.’ Love always wins.”

    Like

  15. Tim, your work always underscores the importance of living a meaningful life, like the memento mori, the reasons why you should not wait to follow your dreams, and the lessons we learned from palliative care physician BJ Miller. And only now it became very real in this truly sad story of Terry, and I am grateful for the way you shared this with us.

    Thank you

    Like

  16. What a brave human being.

    Terry has left his make on the world in an inspiring and positive way. I will be in the pool today in his honor and commit to this. It would have made a fantastic episode no 300.

    Like

  17. Tim,

    Just finished listening to your interview with Terry Laughlin — another great podcast with some heavy emotional impact. I noted from the podcast that you are a recent transplant to Austin, so welcome to ATX! I moved here from San Francisco 18 years ago and absolutely love the area. My office is not far from Deep Eddy and I have enjoyed swimming there for a number of years. Your podcast has convinced me to check out Total Immersion and do some work on my technique. As you may have already determined, options for outdoor activities are not quite as diverse here in ATX as they are in the Bay Area. However, I manage to keep my plate pretty full with hiking, biking, wake surfing, kayaking, live music, and trying to drink a cold beer in each new craft brewery that springs up. If you have not been there yet, check out the Rainey Street area. One day it will be nothing but high rise condos, so embrace it while you can! Feel free to reach out to me if you want to sit down for a beer with a local and get an insider’s perspective.

    Like

  18. This was a beautiful chat. I stumbled on Terry Laughlin and TI when I was taking baby steps with swimming, in order to lose weight. I learnt so much from his books and DVDs, and it led me to Chi Running. I had forgotten how generously and gently Terry came across, accompanied by his great wisdom. I mainly run now, but Terry and TI set me on my way. Cheers for a great podcast, generous to the last

    Like

  19. Tim,

    So sorry for your loss of a dear friend and mentor. I am in my late 50s and have never been comfortable in water. I can minimally swim. I tried getting lessons a few years ago but the quality of lessons was poor. Besides form my main issue is breathing while swimming. I have a deviated septum and breathing through my nose is not ideal. You had a deviated septum while you learned since it was public knowledge that you had it fixed this year. Is there anything you can share to help me deal with this issue? I purchased the TI dvds and will try and teach myself. Finding a good teacher is difficult. I live on Long Island so if you know of any good teachers, please let me know. There is a teacher in Bay Shore on the TI sight but he is very expensive.
    I enjoy your podcast and books and hope you continue to cover a wide range of topics with your guests.

    Tana Piccirillo

    Like

  20. Thank you Tim for bringing Terry on the podcast and sharing his last audio pieces. Sorry about what happened. It’s really sad an heart-breaking he’s not with us here anymore. …

    I believe this episode represents a lot of what you teach all of us, trying to distill from all the interviews – mastery.
    Principles learned in this episodes applied to ANY discipline, any area, that someone tries to improve will bring results above average.

    For me personally the most important lessons were:
    Focus on the skill and constant improvement, mastery will happen automatically.
    How we do anything, our form is more important and must be mastered before speed, and quantity of efforts – it’ll save energy (because we are indeed energy wasting machines most of our existence), and it’s the only way, that we can become world class and “outdo” our competition.

    And also it’s never too late to master a skill and improve. Even in 90s we can still do our best!

    Like

  21. Tim,

    Deepest condolences on your friend and mentor. It was heart-wrenching to listen to but so good in its message. Thanks for mustering the will to record that intro and big thanks to Terry’s family for sharing those final moments. I cannot think of a more sobering way to exemplify human mortality and the importance of every moment.

    Thanks for what you do.

    Best,

    Jared

    Like

  22. Dear Tim,

    I have wanted to write to you since I read Tools of Titans a few months ago. Since then, I proceeded to listening to your podcasts, reading the rest of your books, and pre-ordering Tribe of Mentors. Through your blog, I found that the best way to contact you would be through a comment here. I have hesitated because of how personal my message is, but here it goes.

    Firstly, I am deeply sorry for the loss of such a great man. My heart goes out to you and his family. Thank you for interviewing him and thank you for sharing his interview with us. You honor him by the mention of him in your work and for sharing his knowledge with all of us.

    Secondly, I want to tell you, you have changed my life in a thousand different ways. Before I came across your book, I had been in a 3-year deep depression that was headed in the worst possible direction. Your books taught me about life and how much it was worth living.

    Your books and podcasts make me feel excited to live, learn, and to understand life. Thanks to you, my fear has disappeared and I am a much healthier person both physically and emotionally. Your books and podcasts filled a void inside me that I just couldn’t fill no matter how hard I tried. You have helped me believe in myself again, and I now know I am headed for greatness.

    You have saved me in more ways than one and I am forever grateful to you. There are no words that will ever be able to express my gratitude. For now, all I can do to thank you is to continue to recommend your books, podcasts, and blog to everyone I know. Hopefully some day I will be able to afford your Dubai-like price for a one-on-one with you, since I am sure those “15 minutes of fame” you call your success, will never be up.

    Thank you for what you do,
    Carla

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Your intro drew me in- I lost my best friend with metastatic cancer one week after she had a tragic stroke. I felt the pain of your loss and what a gift to have this interview. I am stuck by the conversation of mediocrity, excellence you two covered. I may try more pleasant experiments, including swimming. I am still listening to the interview (on commute to hospital). So sorry for your loss.

    Like

  24. This episode was beautiful and Terry was so engaging in your conversation. I am sad for his family and friends. I listened to your opening comments and the emotion in your voice and hearing how vibrant and passionate he was just a few weeks before his passing gives me hope that it is possible to live an amazing life to the last moments.

    Like

  25. Hi Tim,
    Thank you for the wonderful interview and, while gut wrenching, the amazing dialogue between Terry and his daughters at the end of your Podcast. It was truly touching.

    Like

  26. My condolences to you, and Terry’s family and friends.

    I can’t stop thinking about my sister-in-law who died of cancer over a year ago. She had suggested a book, “In-Between Days: a memoir about living with cancer” by Teva Harrison. I don’t know Teva and I’m not trying to sell anything. I know you’re someone who is interested in how other’s tick—maybe you’d be interested in how someone is dealing with cancer. The world would be a better place if we’d just try to understand each other (such a simple/hard thing) This book gave me an understanding of what she must have went through. Wish I could have read it sooner.

    Like

  27. Once I listened and incorporated TI I (almost) felt guilty at how much easier swimming was than running. So Terry has been a mentor and friend for a long time. My favorite part was reminding myself how giving yourself is all that matters.

    Like

  28. A very special episode with the annals of the Tim Ferriss show. Terry distills principles of practice (in anything) as deeply as those of swimming. I liked, in particular, how the episode reveals the observations and questioning that came to define the unique Total Immersion method – no doubt with controversy in the swimming coaching world. And so, –
    with personal poignance in the context of Terry being at the end of his life – we get a tapas of insights as to questioning assumptions, biases, convention.

    And Tim’s very personal introduction, and the privilege of hearing the recordings from those dark days of struggle in hospital, will – I suspect – never be forgotten by me and oft returned to.

    Thank you Tim, and Terry’s family for crafting and publishing the episode. And, I’m sorry for your loss. (I very much look forward to buying the book).

    Like

  29. Thanks for this conversation. I used to joke that if you dropped me and a rock in a swimming pool at the same time, I would be on the bottom waiting to catch the rock. Swimming was not an activity, it was an all out fight between me and the water, and the water always won. I don’t like having limitation set on my life, and not being able to swim was a limitation, so about 15 years ago, when I was in my early 30s, I signed up for a triathlon and ordered Total Immersion swimming. One length of the pool soon grew to actual lap swimming. The first time I actually felt like I was gliding through the water I started laughing, laughing and swimming is not advised, but this method is. I no longer see water as a barrier, but as an opportunity. I can still sink with the best of them, but only when I so choose. Thank you Terry…rest in peace.

    Josh

    Like

  30. Thank you for making Terry’s interview available. Thanks to Terry for teaching me how to swim. Rest in peace, Sir. What a wonderful man! He has been a great coach (via book/video) and is teaching some of my friends to swim as well. I learned of him from your incredible hulk talk and ran to get the book. I’d purchased a triathlon bike just after college but never attempted a triathlon due to lack of ability to “lap swim”. I’ve always been very comfortable in the water swimming, skiing etc. No doubt I could survive if dropped in the middle of a lake. However, swimming laps was always the challenge. Something about getting face down, water in my nose and breathing made it too hard. After Total Immersion, my results were amazing. Not as fast as yours, but swimming became fun! I’ve now done a few sprint triathlons and made the podium in my 4th race. I purchased the Tri- bike in 1988 but didn’t do my first race until 2016! I wish I’d found Terry sooner. Just to see if i could, I swam 4000 meters last weekend in 1 hour 32 minutes and felt great after. In December, I’ll do a “birthday swim” of 54 hundred meters and have no doubt about finishing. It’s funny, folks all say the same thing about not being able to swim. I tell them all about the book, but some don’t seem to appreciate coaches who do it different. I’m hooked on your methods and the expert you write about and have on the podcasts. Please keep it up.

    Have you found a bike coach that offers an esoteric way to get fast? That is my next challenge. If you find one, share! You will be a hero to even more triathletes. I now love triathlons and look forward to increasing distance in the future. Why suck at one sport, when you can suck at three!

    Thanks to Terry’s daughters to sharing their recordings at the end of the podcast. It is inspirational to hear him using his methods until the end. You can hear his passion and it no doubt extended his time here with his family.

    Ted

    Like

  31. I too, grew up on Long Island (Long Beach) and never knew how to swim! With the help of Terry’s TI videos on you tube, I became kind of obsessed with the TI way! Just this past weekend my friend and I went to New Paltz, NY and had semi-private lessons with Carsten of the TI studio. We are forever grateful to Terry and his wisdom. He will be greatly missed.

    Like

  32. Great podcast – made more so due to the clear care and friendship between you and Terry. Further, if you get the opportunity please thank Terry’s daughters for the permission to use the recording, and particularly the snippets recorded in the hospital.

    I will be checking the IT process to help with my poor swimming, having swum since the age of five at 54 I moved on and got certified to an advanced scuba diver (with ‘plain’ swimming being my worst skill) and we will see what and where things improve. Thank you again, keep it up.

    Like

    • Doesn’t seem to be listed, but … … here is Tim (a young one ) showing Terry at a TED… … “and that is all you need to know.”

      Thanks again, now I need to find my not-speedos : )))))

      Like

  33. Inspiration that come from those who have experience helps us to motivate ourselves of what we can do. Somebody whom we look up to can be a factor for us to become successful. Since they bring inspiration to us.

    Like

  34. Hey Tim!

    Thank you for publishing this wonderful interview.

    Not only is it a wonderful example of how to deconstruct, re-invent and accelerate learning, but it also showcases a master at life, who enjoys it while empowering others to challenge and conquer limiting beliefs so they can continue creating possibilities and transforming other areas of their lives, and the lives of others.

    Terry truly inspired me. What a guy!!

    Thank you Tim! Keep up the good work!

    Like

  35. This was very inspiring to me. Terry speaks with such clarity. After listening today I took myself and my son to the pool tonight and put his guidance to practice.

    I’ve always appreciated swimming is very technical. The fittest people definitely don’t make the best swimmers. I love going to the local pool and seeing the less “conditioned” swimmers lapping the gym junkies with the bulging muscles or the high VO2max scores. I always felt there was a secret I was missing and I think Terry’s approach could help me find that secret and perfect my stroke at the age of 50.

    Thanks to Tim for making this interview with Terry so his wisdom can be passed on to many others. Perhaps in the end the real message isn’t about swimming, it is about making yourself better, every time you get into the “pool”.

    Vale Terry Laughlin

    Like

  36. Tim,

    This podcast episode rocked my soul. Thanks for adding big hitting words. The end interview with Terry was…. wow. Just insane man.

    I pre-ordered Tribe of Mentors a couple months ago. Very excited! I’ve only paid full price for less than 5 books and 2 are yours.

    Thanks for the great work you do.

    -Nick

    Like

  37. Thank you, thank you for this podcast. I have listened to most, but this one is both heart-wrenching and informative. The ending is also graceful and thoughtful on your part. I listened to the dead air, just long enough to write this comment on your blog.

    Like

  38. Truly amazing, thanks Tim. Beautiful intro tribute to Terry, and an amazing interview.
    I know this is a George Leonard quote, but it was inspiring to hear Terry’s take on it and hear the passion in his voice. Definitely the biggest takeaway for me from this episode:
    “When you practice guided by the principles of mastery there is always positive change happening at the cellular level below your threshold of awareness and periodically this change consolidates into a thrilling leap forward.”

    Like