The First Time Online – Enjoy While You Can

Most of you have never seen this. I really hope you enjoy it. To download, just sign into Vimeo and you’re set. If you Final Cut it up, please set to a Crystal Method or Sevendust soundtrack 🙂

In other breaking news:

I need only 120 more Amazon reviews to beat The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell, a dream I’ve had since 2007! Not because I dislike him, but precisely the opposite — he’s one of my writing role models and I long viewed his book as untouchable.

If you’ve read the 4HWW but haven’t left a short review on Amazon, please take 30 seconds and help me here! The stars are, of course, up to you.

It would really mean a lot to me, and what a milestone it would be as a late Christmas present 🙂

Odds and Ends Elsewhere:

Tim Ferriss on Facebook (includes new videos)

Tim Ferriss – Smash Fear, Learn Anything (TED video)

Afterword – Common Questions

Thanks for all the kind words and questions in the comments! Here are answers to a few common questions:

“Gaijin [foreigner] resentment from the Japanese?”

None whatsoever. Major point of conflict with the production company, as they wanted me to show I was ‘proving my teacher’ wrong, etc. for manufactured drama. Total nonsense. The Japanese teachers and students were some of the most gracious and generous people I’ve ever met. The Japanese get a bum rap for xenophobia, mostly by Americans who go over, speak to them in English, and them call them ‘inscrutable’ when they don’t respond in fluent, idiomatic English. Learn some Japanese and they are 100% fine. Business settings = negotiating = not a representative interaction. Get with the people and interact, preferably with something physical. I’ve never felt this artificial insider/outsider wall people talk about.

“Pre-bed and other preparations for physical only or also mental?”

Also for mental and learning. Pre-bed and mid-night language review is incredibly effective for improving recall.

“How much story arc vs. real issues?”

It was real. The fear of falling off was real. It came up only after arrival that injuries were much more common and severe than expected. The editing didn’t do justice to the drama. We had 100+ hours of footage, and there were some gems that could have replaced other bits in this 45 minutes. It rained for 2-3 days of the practice time, for example, and we couldn’t use the horses. The non-yabusame human-to-human interactions with the Japanese were also missing. Some really hysterical moments.

“Have I been back to train?”

Not yet. I love Nikko and would love to go back. I have spoken with both my teacher (Hayashi) and some of the Japanese crew, however. Truly wonderful people.

“Superhuman book to include cooking?”

The way I do it, yes. Simple stuff that tastes great and works. Boys, don’t worry — it’s bachelor screw-up proof.

“Doing a traditional Japanese martial art myself for many years do you ever get frustrated when you learn a skill and then to a certain extent ‘move on’ that you’re just scratching the surface?”

A few people asked this. I don’t try and “hack” everything and move on. I do believe in the enjoyment of constant practice as an exercise, almost like meditation. It’s important to balance achievement with appreciation, and there are skills that I continue to practice without abandoning them. In fact, I don’t feel like I abandon much. Even if I haven’t really practiced tango since 2006, for example, the skills and awareness I developed in tango are applicable to other things, even yabusame. I feel like each is intertwined with the next, so I’m — on a macro-level — constantly working on a process of skill-development that spreads across these various experiments.

In simpler terms, I’m just having fun and doing what makes me most excited. I see nothing wrong with this. For some, that will mean 1 skill a year, others 1 skill a month, and others still, one skill a lifetime.

All are fair.

The Tim Ferriss Show is one of the most popular podcasts in the world with more than 500 million downloads. It has been selected for "Best of Apple Podcasts" three times, it is often the #1 interview podcast across all of Apple Podcasts, and it's been ranked #1 out of 400,000+ podcasts on many occasions. To listen to any of the past episodes for free, check out this page.

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376 Replies to “The First Time Online – Enjoy While You Can”

  1. I’m somewhat embarrassed to say that I actually cheered when you hit the first target – out loud, in my office, go figure – but was really inspired to see you pull it off. You didn’t mention anything in the show about jet lag or whether or not you felt any gaijin resentment from any of the sensei or other yabusameka. Did that happen?

  2. Thanks for the video feed. I was wondering what had become of the TV show.

    I just started re-reading the book again. I just have to find that sweet spot between work (income) and play.

  3. WOW!

    Tim,

    Thank you so VERY much for sharing this.

    EVERY second was a charge.

    Just incredible.

    Congrats.

    It left me feeling great to see you honored the teachers as well

    as yourself in your success.

    They too will now have wonderful memories of your visit.

    John

  4. Tim-

    Are you familiar with the Six Sigma method of deconstructing a process, streamlining it and implementing those changes?

    -Shaun

  5. Hey Tim, great video, and I see that you’re well over 1,000 reviews now! Glad I could contribute.

    Anyway, a couple points that got me thinking in your video that I was hoping you could expand on sometime:

    1) Converting short term motor skills to long term memory, the process of doing things before bed and then when you wake up. Is it just for physical movements or other applications?

    2) Sleep science and how you use a kitchen timer to act as your alarm. Wasn’t quite sure what you meant by sleep debt and whether the 4.5hr time is just for learning skills.

    3) The icing/warmth strategy. How many times do you do that 2min/:30 cycle?

  6. WOW! Awesome challenge and even more awesome achievement.

    I was particularly intrigued by your brief mention of memory mapping and process to etch into memory what you were learning by leveraging your sleeping patterns. A book about those processes and models in laymans terms would be a great idea to build upon for aspiring “lifehackers” Love your book, best wishes to you.

    May many scream like a warrior to dominate their endeavors.

    Danny

  7. Review complete. I do love all things Malcolm Gladwell, but Tim is the one author I’d like to see pass him up. Not just because he’s been an excellent role-model for me, but because I think the principles in the 4HWW can really improve peoples’ lives. Thanks for everything Tim (and thank you 4HWW community for all the additional advice and inspiration).

  8. Hi Tim,

    Bought both books, excellent, and thank you so much, life-changing!!

    Can we do a trade? I’ll write a review if you can have a quick look at my company/muse (click my name to see it) and tell me the top 5 ways to market this and get some clients?

    Cheers,

    Zi

  9. Great video, well done.

    If you had a bigger budget, some 3D model comparisons for alignment and posture between the master and student would have looked cool.

    The rubber band trainer was a very good idea and a well done overlay.

  10. Great video, fun to watch. I’ve been riding horses since I was a kid and it takes some practice and a lot of trust in your animal when you do things without the reigns. Way to concur your fears.

  11. I loved this show when it aired on the History Channel, it was actually that show and lifehacker.com that led me here. I’ve been following ever since.

  12. I was most impressed by your practice with “the old rubber band” at 0:28 🙂

    You coud easily have lost your sight if it had broken while stretched like that!

  13. Done! Here is my 5 star review.

    Tim Ferriss has written the definitive book on work/life balance for the new decade and beyond. Tim embraces technology to the point where it makes him most effective at achieving his goals. He uses advances in communication, software as a service, and a term he calls geoarbitrage to realize his dreams which often have nothing to do with technology. His thoughts on the concept of work and personal identity (think, “not to have but to be or do”) are reenergizing to someone who might think they’ll be facing another 25 years in a cubicle jail.

    Most importantly he gives extrememly detailed examples of living the “Four Hour Work Week” life from his own experience, but now from many of his readers and fans (from the first edition of his book and his blog)who validate much of what Tim has to say. It would be a mistake to dismiss Tim as a new digital-age huckster as some have done. His words and life will challenge you to rethink your life and to ask yourself the all important question, “Why don’t I deserve the life of my dreams?”

  14. Wow great job on the show! Although I wish you would put up a bullet list or even a blog post on recovery methods (such as the hot-cold bath).

    Great Stuff

    Dave

  15. I’m utterly confused why this show didn’t get picked up. Yesterday I caught a few minutes of Junior Seau’s new show “Sports Jobs.” In the episode he was being taught how to mow the greens on a golf course… Compared to “Trial by Fire” it looked like one of those VHS tapes chain restaurants force you to watch at a new job. How did producers conclude this what people want to see?

    At least we have this one episode. Riveting stuff, informative, and very good editing. Looking forward to whatever Tim comes up with next.

  16. Great video man I could have never seen it any other way because I don’t watch tv.

    I think you should keep doing challenges like this because they are really motivational and inspiring I saw a few haters post some stupid comments but I still think its cool.

    Its nice that you are actually giving back some entertainment to blogs I think it engages people more too.

    About the comment of the book,I did that too good luck with that and I am sure you will get it that book is awesome just ordered the new version just to support you because I like what you are doing.

  17. I didn’t buy the updated book but I left you a good review on amazon just now based on my impressions of your original book which I have read many times. 🙂

    Now, I’m just waiting impatiently about your book about superhumans which you mentioned a while ago.

    Any updates on that?

  18. Tim,

    That was a fantastic video. I think that everyone can learn a thing from the way you overcame various obstacles and reached your goal. Your determination, confidence, and focus is nothing short of impressive. Thanks for posting!

    Mike

  19. thanks tim for some reason some cable company did not carry so im physic to watch this =) since im working towards becoming a master lifehacker

  20. Loved the video, I agree with some of the other comments, should have been a tv series. You tv/camera manner is great.

    Definately inspiring and you’ll obviously be delighted that I’ve been inspired to buy and have a read of your book. I can’t believe I’ve not read it already.

    Good Stuff Tim.

    Robert

  21. That was seriously awesome.

    I am a trained actor, writer, and director so I don’t often get swept up in production storytelling. However, I literally cheered when you hit the first target, and it was because of your honesty and transparency about your fear. I wanted you to succeed.

    Very well done. Major kudos to your production team. What a great way to spend 45 minutes.

  22. I can hardly say how much I enjoyed that video. I love Japan and Japanese culture, and getting “inside” like that and getting to participate must have been such an incredible experience. I loved watching the ritual that went into the activity — and I loved all your instructors. Such elegance and humility combined with incredible skill. Of course, it was also fascinating watching how you prepared for the challenge. One special treat for me was seeing the samurai stirrups in use. I have one that was given to me by my father when I was in high school, and I use it as a book end. Seeing it attached to a saddle gives it context.

    Having been injured a number of times in riding accidents, I can appreciate your working through the fear of falling during your training. It is not a pleasant experience. I’m pleased that your ability to break tasks down enabled you to succeed at the task and still, as you wished, be able to walk away on your own two feet.

    Now I need to start saving up for my next trip to Japan.

    Again, thanks for sharing.

  23. Thanks for posting the video. I didn’t get a chance to see it the first time. I really enjoyed the video. Certainly some improvements could be made, but very enjoyable. I have a feeling that we haven’t heard the last of trial by fire. With the choices on tv, this would be a welcome series. Hope you find the right team.

    One comment on the show. In future shows I would like to see/understand more of the breakdown of the learning process. Not that we are all going to go and try yabusame, but so we can apply principles to our own processes.

    Enjoy South Africa.

    Cheers.

  24. Done!

    What’s with the over intellectualized responses to this blog post? Do the guy a favor, write a review on amazon – it will take 2 minutes, you spent 30 minutes dreaming up your whiny comment. He’s not asking you to write a 5 star review, he’s asking you to write “a” review. It’s the least you could do given the value of the FREE content you get through the blog.

    1250 odd reviews now Tim…looks like you smashed your 1k target, good work!

  25. Tim.

    Thanks for “the sound of the breaking target.”

    A couple of questions.

    1. At the end of the video you said “I still have a lot to learn.” Have you returned to learn more? And can you identify areas in your life where this training benefited you?

    2. Can you share your methods for learning Japanese? I would like to apply them to improve my Japanese language.

    Thanks .

  26. Merry Christmas, Tim. haha

    Man, I love this book. It affects every day, and no doubt, it will for the rest of my life. Especially when my muse takes off.

    Tim, do you think that if a person can just get a financial foothold with his muse, then his subsequent creative projects can actually become his next muses? If a muse has REAL value, then it should last long enough anyway.

    Mark

  27. Toshiro Mifune practiced this art, I am told. If you watch “The Hidden Fortress,” you’ll see one sequence when Mifune rides the way John Wayne wished he could ride.

    I remember an exhibition of Japanese martial arts masters years ago at Boston University. Just watching the way the archers walked into the arena was breath-taking. I could see their discipline and commitment in just one step. That’s what a lifetime of practice can do for you.

    Tim, there is something to be said for daily practice over time. Hacking the process and accelerated learning are not necessarily bad but developing a discipline day after day has deep value that intensive learning for short periods will not get you.

    For instance, I go to concerts at NE Conservatory and the students there have talent and chops beyond my imagination but they are invariably put to shame when the visiting professionals take the stage. Years of work on the craft are immediately evident. I recognize the same easy precision in the way they handle their instruments as I saw in the step of those aged Japanese archers.

  28. Letting go of the reins is a great metaphor letting go of control for outsourcing.

    When you do let go, you can accomplish far more.

    Great video, you inspire as always.

  29. Practical, Proven Approach to Living a Bigger Life

    As an extremely reluctant and late fan to Tim Ferriss’s ideas (those who make their living as paid speakers have seen alot of hype) I have gone to the other end of the spectrum in admiration for the practicality and specificity of Tim’s methods to streamline one’s life to live it bigger.

    Outsourcing. Automating. Focus on getting better at what you do best by spending more time doing it. Planning for play – or perhaps seeing life as a continuum of living fully- rather than dividing it up into always-separate categories. Stay curious. Learn and do the things that draw you – not “just” to be productive.

    He has honed his methods, added to and crowdsourced more – rewarding those who support him with visibility and other value.

    In this ever more connected world where, next to your top talent, your capacity to collaborate – especially with people who are unlike you – to accomplish greater things than you can alone Ferriss is tops in continuing to offer, in this expanded book and elsewhere – actionable methods to improve oneself, one’s work and one’s life. Now i will get off my soapbox.

  30. Hi Tim,

    I’ve started my Dreamline. I set up some action steps and moving through them. After I’m done, I need to create new action steps right? Going back to the action steps every 3 days is pretty often. Why 3 steps, why not 5 or 7?

    I’ve bought several of your books, will leave a review in a bit.

    How realistic is the production video vs what really happened? Did they drama it up a bit? Any of it faked or video taped twice? There’s that other guy who survives in the wilderness, then it was exposed that he was not alone, and had a support team next to him the whole time. I know you’re a real guy, you wouldn’t make a sham video.

    I’m taking up archery, not cool archery on the back of a moving horse tho. I’m gonna implement a few of your tips from the video, like hacking sleep and the contrast therapy. I also realize I need to practice more. You said you practiced the draw 1200 times in 2 days. I’m nowhere close!

    Have a great day Tim, and stay dry!

    Jeffrey

  31. Totally appreciated the reference to the 37Signals podcast / David Heinemeier Hansson presentation… His off-handed comment about Zappos not being first in the shoe-selling business has inspired me to think about Swim Kitten in a whole new way, and not sweat the non-uniqueness of it so much.

    I’ve also decided to lay off of AdWords a little bit for a while in order to reduce the financial pressure for it to perform while I figure out why my long tail organic traffic is bouncing at 3x the rate that the AdWords traffic is. I need to upgrade many things on the site itself, and am looking into affiliate campaigns as an alternative/complement to AdWords. Since I don’t have a statistically predictable conversion rate yet, paying out a known commission is much safer than feeding AdWords with my fingers crossed.

    I’ll be cross-posting this in the Shopify forums. Hoping more people will come and play there! Off to the Crunchies tonight!

  32. I realized I’d never written a review of your book, so I did it. What a silly thing to overlook.

    Thanks Tim for the movement you’ve definitely helped spark worldwide.

    Also, thanks for posting that video of your show. I remember when it piloted. Did anything ever come of it?

  33. The vid is great. If stuff like this was on television, I would actually have a use for the glass tit. Sorry Tim, the networks only like shows about people who’ve become morbidly obese and then shed a few pounds and cry a lot.

  34. Wow. I love the tidbits of neuroscience you throw into that show such as how you practice before bed, set a timer to wake you up in 4.5 hours, and practice again right before falling asleep to your second REM cycle, the way you do hyperclocking(the same concept I used to learn speedreading), the cold/hot showering, and the explanation of fear. You’re consistent with the personality your book and blog portray. This is legit. Great mind-body connection.

  35. Congratulations Tim on completing such a tough challenge.

    You had me on the edge of my seat for that last run!

    It is truly inspiring to witness you putting what you teach into practice.

  36. Should of done the review when I got the book. You surpassed the mark, but it was humbling giving back just a bit for everything you have done, for a lot of people.

    That video was impressive to say the least. You not only preach but actually live what you tell. No bullshit here.

    You have a ton of ‘Konjo’ and I appreciate everything you have taught, and I love this blog!

  37. That was seriously cool to watch! Added my review. I love Gladwell too, don’t get me wrong. I can also understand having abstract goals though. Ignore anyone giving you a hard time about “needing” to beat him. We all have our benchmarks. You simply have the courage to let people in on some of yours!

    Have a great time in Africa!

  38. Love the show, great concept. For what it’s worth, assuming you’ve never played golf before(you actually mentioned this when responding to my question on Ustream), if you could figure out how to break 85 in 5 days after picking up the game you would go viral really quickly in the U.S. Just get the feeling that people don’t grasp how hard shooting a target off a horse is, but I can assure there are millions of golfers who know how hard it is to break 85.

    Reviewed the book, congrats on breaking 1k

  39. With some of the the utter crap that’s on TV, it’s a crime this isn’t an ongoing show. Fantastic.

    I will tell you that seeing stuff like the hot-cold treatment just makes me want your next book all that much more. Can’t get here soon enough.

  40. Thats wiked Tim; nice work. I wonder if the warrior yelling sealed the deal; it must have been a bit wild and liberating to let that sound out. Awesome.

    Can you or any readers please explain and provide a learning reference to the practice/sleep/wake@4.5hrs(pre-rem?)/practice/sleep method?

    Is that an NLP thing? I’m all for hyper learning and efficiency, just need a good book to understand and apply the process in detail.

    Have fun on your next adventure.

    ps: I think you are what career coach Barbara Sher refers to as a “scanner”. Also known as renaissance people.

    Best-Natalie

  41. Very cool pilot, bro. Kinda reminds me of that show on National Geographic (I think?) that fused science and fighting, to determine which fighting style delivered the deadliest blow. The analytics are fascinating.

    Still, I think I prefer ‘Random Episode’ 🙂

  42. That was pretty cool. Have you heard of the “Worst Case Scenario” handbooks? It might be interesting to try a few things out of those.

    Btw. Hyperclocking => Overclocking

  43. Amazing episode Tim and thanks for introducing me to such a facinating tradition from Japan. Since the show, have you returned to train some more?

  44. @Tim: Interesting that you can accelerate consolidation of procedural memory by rehearsing before sleep. Don’t yet get the opposite effect with declarative memory, where rehearsal just before sleep impairs consolidation? Who discovered the “rehearse before bedtime” rule?

  45. Finally I see the kitchen timer mentioned in previous posts! Awesome.

    I like how everything is broken down, especially the part about doing it before sleep and before the next REM cycle.

    These concepts are great and very simple in this video. I’m going to apply a lot of these ideas you showed in this video into learning a lot of different things.

    Thanks Tim! My review for the book on amazon will be up soon.

  46. I’ve been waiting for that video – thanks so much for sharing it. Really, really amazing how you put all that together. I was so relieved at the end that you hadn’t crashed/cracked your head open/spilled your guts everywhere. That fear was there for a reason, even if it was worth overcoming!

  47. Just finished the video,

    Used to live in japan and I found myself asking questions and responding to your Sensei’s comments, gave me a thrill to be speaking again.

    When you hit the second target I yelled out a “YATTA!” that disrupted the Laker game in the other room! Greatly enjoyed the show…

    Tim, I liked the concept of over-clocking to flex your comfort zones radically enough to make what was previously out of reach become more obtainable.

    I would really like to see this as a blog post with multiple examples.

    Title it something like:

    “Overclocking your life, a short cut past fear”

  48. Wow!!! I was waiiiiting to watch this video since a long time. Don’t think History Channel aired this in India!

    You were fantastic Tim. Thanks for sharing all your secrets 😉

    Looking forward to learn more from you, always.

  49. Great video Tim!

    Took all night to download from my hotel room but was worth it.

    I remember spending an hour or so looking for it over the internet a few months back with no luck so great to finally see it.

    Too bad about your issues with the producers as the series would have been very interesting. Lots to learn.

    Thanks again

    V

  50. Excellent video! Was looking for it just yesterday; thank you for getting it posted. I am currently reading 4HWW…

    Best regards!

  51. THANK YOU! It’s official. Surpassed The Tipping Point. I’d love to answer a few questions that came up:

    “Gaijin [foreigner] resentment from the Japanese?”

    None whatsoever. Major point of conflict with the production company, as they wanted me to show I was ‘proving my teacher’ wrong, etc. for manufactured drama. Total bullshit. They were some of the most gracious and generous people I’d ever met. The Japanese get a bum rap for xenophobia, mostly by Americans who go over, speak to them in English, and them call them ‘inscrutable’ when they don’t respond in fluent, idiomatic English. Learn some Japanese and they are 100% A-OK outside of a business setting. Business = negotiating = not a representative interaction. Get with the people and interact, preferably with something physical. I’ve never felt this artificial insider/outsider wall people talk about.

    “Pre-bed and other preparations for physical only or also mental?”

    Also for mental and learning. Pre-bed and mid-night language review is incredibly effective.

    “How much story arc vs. real issues?”

    It was real. The fear of falling off was real. It came up only after arrival that injuries were much more common and severe than expected. The editing didn’t do justice to the drama. We had 100+ hours of footage, and there were some gems that could have replaced other bits in this 45 minutes. It rained for 2-3 days of the practice time, for example, and we couldn’t use the horses. The non-yabusame human-to-human interactions with the Japanese were also missing. Some hysterical moments.

    “Have I been back to train?”

    Not yet. I love Nikko and would love to go back. I have spoken with both my teacher (Takahashi) and some of the Japanese crew. Truly great people.

    “Superhuman book to include cooking?”

    The way I do it, yes. Simple stuff that tastes great and works. Boys, don’t worry — it’s bachelor screw-up proof.

    “Doing a traditional Japanese martial art myself for many years do you ever get frustrated when you learn a skill and then to a certain extent ‘move on’ that you’re just scratching the surface?”

    A few people asked this. I don’t try and “hack” everything and move on. I do believe in the enjoyment of constant practice as an exercise, almost like meditation. It’s important to balance achievement with appreciation, and there are skills that I continue to practice without abandoning them. In fact, I don’t feel like I abandon much. Even if I haven’t really practiced tango since 2006, for example, the skills and awareness I developed in tango are applicable to other things, even yabusame. I feel like each is intertwined with the next, so I’m — on a macro-level — constantly working on a process of skill-development that spreads across these various experiments.

    In simpler terms, I’m just having fun and doing what makes me most excited. I see nothing wrong with this. For some, that will mean 1 skill a year, others 1 skill a month, and others still, one skill a lifetime.

    All are fair.

  52. You have now officially gone from sorta nerdy author to total badass! Congrats…and uh..lets keep the ego under control right?

    😛

    Also congrats on your new book release. Really loved the first one.

    😀

    1. Thanks, Lance. Not to worry — the ego’s under control. Don’t forget that History Channel passed on the show! I’m also hoping to record enough of these that you’ll get to see me get my ass kicked by at least a few 🙂

      Tim

  53. Amazing episode. Very entertaining (inspiring too). It’s nice to see that you actually live your ideals you put in your book (which is a favourite btw) which is refreshing when most life-coaches for want of a better word don’t take their own advice…

    I hope this show becomes a series – it’s great. I wonder how I’d be able to view it here in the UK. We get things a little later than you here; maybe via the net?

    Many thanks. You’ve changed my life and it’s only been a week.

    Peace.

  54. Tim – Dude I don’t think you realize your genius. This is a great video.

    My suggestion is that your next book is expounding on the techniques you use to conquer fears. You touch on it in the first book but I think people would be interested in hearing your adventures and how many times you did not let fear prevent you from accomplishing you goal.

    Im reading a book now that speaks to it the Secret Code of Success but I think what you do is much more interesting. You actually live it and challenge yourself by learning new things.

    So many people are ruled by fear I think people would love it.

    Any plans for a book like that in the works.

    Please and blessings,

    jprimos

  55. That was AWESOME!! I was so happy when you hit the target. I love the fact that complete failure was out there for everyone to see and just stayed in the zone. You never lost your cool. You just worked through the fear and came out on the other side feeling like a million bucks.

  56. Tim,

    The vid was excellent; PLEASE continue to make more episodes – in the future, perhaps keep an eye on the editing so that the gems are included.

    To quote:

    “Pre-bed and other preparations for physical only or also mental?”

    Also for mental and learning. Pre-bed and mid-night language review is incredibly effective.

    You have got to flesh this point out. The application of this is enormous. Can time in college be cut in half just by reviewing notes between REM cycles? Can a deeper and faster understanding of math/physics/chemistry/french be gained by reviewing material between REM cycles?

    I’ll definitely be trying this out, tonight in fact. I’d discovered a while ago, by accident, an effective way to gently wake myself up between REM cycles.

    Play some calming music (I listen to baroque, classical) in the background (I prefer earphones) and fall asleep to it. If you have the volume just right, you’ll slowly become aware of the music towards the end of a REM cycle. At this point I often remove my earphones or just turn the music off by remote, but I’m thinking of reviewing some notes for 5-10 mins before I fall asleep again to the music.

    I’ll probably purchase the upcoming ‘bio’ alarm clocks that monitor REM cycles and wake you up gently at the end of a cycle, but for now I’ll suffice with my method above. ;D

  57. Tim, that was one of the most amazing videos I’ve ever seen! I’m really looking forward for more episodes and for a DVD-Set! :))

    Thank you so much for your whole work! You’re a source of inspiration to me!

    Julio Cezar.

  58. Looked to write you on Kindle Editions msssing parts…but none of your “Contact me’s cover this”

    in Kindle position 1881-87 in the VS section… your first VS in each section shows, but not what it is VS’ing.

    Example….

    Say it this way

    VS

    Or another example is, this and this

    VS

    Perhaps a point of contact for publication mistakes? Just a thought.

    I went to leave a review, but Amazon won’t let me since I reviewed the first book already. Odd.